• What is a Works Cited List?  

    MLA style requires you to include a Works Cited list (similar to a bibliography) on a separate page at the end of your research paper.  This is a detailed list of the sources that you cited within the body of your paper.  Since parenthetical citations only note the author's last name (or title, if there is no author) and page number, an interested reader can refer to the details that are provided on the Works Cited list to find out more about a source.

     

    Formatting the List 

     
    Alphabetize -List sources in alphabetical order according to the first word in each entry.  The first word is usually the author’s last name, but may be the title if there is no author for a particular source.  Ignore “a”, “an”, or “the” if these are the first words in the title.
     
    Font & Spacing - This is the last page of your paper and so it is formatted with the same font and spacing as the rest of the paper.  Be sure to use Times New Roman 12 point and double space.
     
    No Numbering - Do not number entries.  You may, however, wish to note numbers for each entry on a first draft to identify the order in which you will need to type them.
     
    Indent - If an entire entry fits on a single line, no indenting is necessary.  If an entry requires more than one line, indent (tab once) on each line that comes after the first one.
     
    Dates - Format all dates according to MLA style (day month year).
     
    Page Title - Center the words Works Cited as the title for this page.  Do not underline or bold  Each source must be listed individually as a separate entry on the Works Cited page and entries are listed alphabetically according to the first word.
     
    Running Header - As part of your paper, this should also have a running header, which includes your last name and the page number.  Be sure to number it accordingly as your last page.
     

    Formatting Works Cited Entries

    Documenting Sources for the Works Cited to view formatting guidelines for books, magazines, web sites, database articles and other source types.

    Visit the MLA Style Guide provided by Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) for more details and examples.